The Gloucester Light Dory

IMG_3056

My daughter has notions of building a rowboat. I wonder where she got that idea? In an effort to help her find a simple and effective build, “Dynamite” Payson’s Gloucester Light Dory came to mind. I’ve seen the design several times in Maine and have been impressed with its docile qualities, simple construction, functional details and elegance. My daughter read the Payson’s “How to Build …” booklet yesterday. However, she didn’t know I’d decided to make her a model as a gift. No push is intended, but maybe it will remind the girl to follow her dream compass.

 

 

Doug Hylan’s Chesapeake Crab Skiff

Doug Hylan has a number of beautiful designs. Not the smallest, but certainly one of the prettiest, is this little 15′ plywood constructed skiff. Off Center Harbor featured the boat awhile back here. I built a 1/2 model … Go figure. This would be an excellent boat for teaching how to “simply mess about in boats”. I think I will. Get it?

IMG_2907.JPG

In the meantime, we have some more wall art.

IMG_2912.jpg

Now, back to work!! Slacker!

IMG_2908

IMG_2904.jpg

 

 

LUNA’s Facelift

If only it was so simple for the rest of us. Hard to believe we have owned (had stewardship) of LUNA for 2 years now. After a few bumps and bruises, she needed a new coat. 3 years seems to be the limit for a linear polyurethane exposed to our sun and salt water anyway. That may be 1 year longer than traditional paint. I’ll take it.

IMG_2871
First coat

Thought I’d offer a few tips in the rolling and tip method to covering, some I’ve scoped on-line and some I just had to learn by doing.

  • Conditions: Warm, 70-75 degrees, still, somewhat humid, but early morning.
  • Materials: Interlux Brightsides “Matterhorn White”, Interlux Brushing liquid 333, Tee shirt rags, white “hot dog” roller pads, small paint pan, 3m blue painter’s tape, 3m wet sanding block #220, etc.
  • I previously had wooded, sanded (120 grit to 220) and applied 5 coats of LeTonkinois on the toe rail port and starboard. I’ve saving a final 6th coat until topsides are done.
  • Topsides were wet sanded with the 220 sponge, rinsed, and dings fared with a red glazing compound that worked on UNA well. These spots were then sanded.
  • Before painting wetted the surrounding yard +/-20′ from the boat to knock down the dust.
  • Topsides were then taped off from rail and boot top, sides cleaned with the 333 thinner and hit with a tag rag.
  • A pint of paint was added to pan with 1 cap full of the 333. My middle son took rolling instructions and was a big help. We started at the starboard bow and worked around the boat. We are both right-handed. This allowed me to follow his 18-24″ application by roller with my backhand tipping from top to bottom.
  • Even with the thinner, we had to move fast. Here is a big tip we learned after the first few applications: The brush tipping must overlap the previous patch by a good 8-12″ in order to not telegraph each start and stop.
  • In rolling, place paint in thin coats from left to right and finish with up and down rolling for horizontal tipping from top to bottom, quickly. Do this twice. Once with more pressure to push the paint along evenly and the last with a delicate touch. By this time the roller boy has the next spot ready.
  • We were done in 1 hour. The port side looks best as the technique was mastered by then. A little gentle wet sanding of the starboard side will improve it. You cannot go back and work out any drips or imperfections while the paint is drying. Forget about it. Save it for the next coat.
  • 2 hours later and no drips whatsoever are evident. Thinner coats are better than heavier. 1 quart of paint may get 2 coats done.
IMG_2870
Wineglass gorgeous

We took the dog for a swim and waited 2 days before coat number 2.

 

IMG_2872
dog paddling

 

Coat 2 was quicker and covered the sins from coat 1. Using the same color paint allowed 2 coat coverage and all with less than a quart! 28″ is so much easier to care for than 42. No surprise there, but it is a factor of 4. I’m very happy with the results.

IMG_2874
Found a 1/2 dozen gnats in the mix. To be expected in July.
IMG_2876
Overall. Bootstrap is next.

Given the weather has not held rain (but it is coming), I sketched an idea this morning for shade to go after the decks.

 

IMG_2891
scribble

 

But … Couldn’t finish the real thing in today’s heat, 99 degrees.

IMG_2886
Had to take a “swim” myself. Bud Light helped too. Stinking hot!

September is coming. More later. Stay cool.

IMG_2892
Shelter gained.

Later: got the last trusses and tarps on. The whole elaborate thing took longer than expected, but not having to yank tarps on and off and to have shade makes the whole prospect of working the decks and cabin more appealing. The old traps came from years ago when I renovated our first cruising boat “Emily”, a 1974 Pearson 1 Meter. She too was a nice boat. Too many of them out there. Here she is after an Imron paint job and 2-3 years of sometimes weekend alterations and repair. Too much to list. Emily took us for many, many weeks up and down the Bay for maybe 15 years. Memories.

Going to add some hurricane ties from rafter to beam wall and add a couple cross beams under the trailer for any uplift risk. Not today though. Real feel 105. Yep, it is out there.

Mikey Floyd’s “Salty Heaven”

This 17′ boat is one of several boats I mulled over before building UNA. Floyd really got some beautiful lines set here. She looks so workmanlike.

Salty800
Mikey Floyd in his “Salty Heaven”, the original boat.

No laps in the intended clinker construction in this 1/2 hull, but the grace still shines through. Could still be a project down the road. In the meantime I’ve some more wall art.

IMG_2837

 

Dare I Err?

When will it stop? The symptoms are consistent and persistent, indicating a severe case of “next boat” psychosis: a beautiful design catches the eye, offers a possible solution for some niche of boating I’d like to do or perfect. From there an infatuation develops quickly. Much studying and “rationalizing” time is spent. Once past those tests, I jump wholeheartedly … until, the next one comes along. How I’ve finished the boats I have built surprises me. Thank God there are far fewer lovely designs compared to the loads of uglies never to steal my time.

I was set on the Gartsides’ Lugger, had cut staves for the spars and shaped the boomkin. All was fine until I found he had posted a new design, the Ditch Witch, interesting in concept, but too small. However, it led me to taking another look at his Spartan II, a trailer capable cutter whose dimensions approximate those of the Lugger. Why me?!

To add fuel to the fire, Boat Design Quarterly reviewed the original Spartan. I ordered that issue, read and re-read the feature. Curiosity took hold. I then purchased study plans for Spartan II to which Mr. Gartside graciously added the lines plan allowing me to build another half hull matching the scale of the  Lugger for close comparison. A nice enough 2×6 pine board was found for the model’s lifts which were cut, glued, carved, and sanded fair. Details and rig were added.

 

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Here are some final model pics.

IMG_2781

IMG_2782

IMG_2783

 

This design is a beauty too. For a whole host of reasons, I’m torn between these 2 boats. As luck would have it the staves already cut for the Lugger can be used for the Spartan. I suspect the cutter is another 25% time investment to build. That wineglass Lugger transom is nice. The cutter has a group of sails that would be fun to play with and I bet she’ll plane. The simple Lugger is one I know and love. Her cockpit is more generous and no compression post in the cabin.

Geez! See what I mean?

IMG_2785

SaveSave

9 Seconds of a Lazy Day

My middle boy and I met up with Bob down at Lake Chesdin for the day. This reservoir sits on the border of Chesterfield and Dinwiddie Counties. We had UNA and Molly in tow. The public landing has two concrete ramps with a short sturdy pier between the two. The day was overcast and hazy with little humidity, thanks to thunderstorms the night before. The 7-10 mph winds never materialized, but the 0-5 offered some challenging lake sailing. Bob provided and early tow upstream using his Torquedo. The quiet motor pulled to generate an apparent wind that almost felt like sailing. We stopped maybe 2/3rds of the way for lunch before a fun sail home. No, we weren’t racing, but whenever there are two boats on the water …

IMG_2767
Torqueedo Bob

Molly and UNA traded tacks as we searched for the “luck”. A lot of racing is getting to that luck first.

IMG_2774
Molly strutting along. Nice sail shape.

The Sooty and Caledonia were very closely matched. I’m guessing my added crew made our displacements even. The Sooty does a slightly narrower water line beam. However, I observed that between 0-3 mph Molly slowly stepped away with +60 SF more sail area. Then, from 4-7 (high winds) UNA came into her own and seemed to gain on tacks.

IMG_2771
The frantic crew

The boats altered passing tacks maybe a dozen times all the way home. A win could not be claimed decisively. However, UNA got to the last bend in the lake first and slid home downwind. Just as we were about to tag base the wind died and on came Molly. She passed us not 60′ further off shore and scored a win in the last 100 yards. Congrats Bob! Looking forward to next time!

Here are 9 seconds of the “race” that typified the day.